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  • caribou-alphabet-cover
    caribou-alphabet-cover

    A Caribou Alphabet

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    Once common in the northern United States, caribou are more closely identified with the Canadian arctic - and with Lapland, where their domesticated relatives, reindeer, are essential to the lives of the indigenous people. Through art and rhyme, this book celebrates the strength and beauty of one of nature's great survivors.
  • Gift for Gita, A
    Gift for Gita, A

    A Gift for Gita

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    In A GIFT FOR GITA, by Rachna Gilmore, Gita has made friends in her adopted home, but is now faced with the possibility of returning to India where most of her relatives still live. A Gift for Gita is a touching story about the importance of friendship and stability and the meaning of 'home'. This is the final book in the critically acclaimed series.
  • 9780884485230cover
    9780884485230cover

    Astronaut Annie

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    Annie's joyful exuberance and her family's wholehearted support leave no doubt that her dream is within her grasp. This delightful story?with backmatter about women astronauts?encourages young readers to pursue their dreams and reach for the stars.
  • Bear-ly There
    Bear-ly There

    Bear-ly There

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    In BEAR-LY THERE, by author/illustrator Rebekah Raye, we learn what do you do when there's a bear in your backyard. A big black bear shows up one moonlit night and creates a real ruckus, first breaking into the shed where the grain is kept for the geese (who aren't too happy about it), then raiding the bird feeders. The bear is also causing problems at other homes in the neighborhood, getting into the trash and compost and eating dog food that was left out overnight. One neighbor offers to shoot it. Another one suggests calling the game warden to have the bear tranquilized and relocated. But the child among them knows what is best. A bear belongs in the woods, he says, and together with the adults clears the yards in the neighborhood of any food that would tempt the bear. His dad comes up with a good idea for warning the bear away--and it works!
  • before-we-eat-cover
    before-we-eat-cover

    Before We Eat

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    Before we eat, many people must work very hard planting grain, catching fish, tending animals, and filling crates. In this book, vibrantly illustrated by Caldecott Medalist Mary Azarian, readers find out what must happen before food can get to our table to nourish our bodies and spirits.
  • BoatofDreams COVER_03.cdr
    BoatofDreams COVER_03.cdr

    Boat of Dreams

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    How does a fastidious old man with bowler, umbrella, suspenders, and a Salvador Dali mustache come to live on a deserted island?
  • CatchingAir_FINAL COVER
    CatchingAir_FINAL COVER

    Catching Air: Taking the Leap with Gliding Animals

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    Only a few dozen vertebrate animals have evolved true gliding abilities, but they include an astonishing variety of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • City Fish, Country Fish
    City Fish, Country Fish

    City Fish, Country Fish

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    In CITY FISH, COUNTRY FISH, by Mary Cerullo, we discover that how like some people live in the country, close to the land, where they enjoy peace and quiet, others live in high-rise apartments in the city and love the hustle and bustle of crowds and nonstop activity, both day and night. In many ways fish are very similar. In the ocean there are places that have some of the characteristics of the country or of the city. Like the classic tale of The City Mouse and the Country Mouse, there are advantages and disadvantages to each habitat. We'll compare how the fishes that live in tropical seas (the city) and those that swim through cold oceans (the country) meet the challenges and opportunities of their own ecosystems.
  • E.B. White on Dogs
    E.B. White on Dogs

    E.B. White on Dogs

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    In E. B. WHITE ON DOGS, his granddaughter and manager of his literary estate, Martha White, has compiled the best and funniest of his essays, poems, letters, and sketches depicting over a dozen of White's various canine companions. Featured here are favorite essays such as 'Two Letters, Both Open,' where White takes on the Internal Revenue Service, and also 'Bedfellows,' with its 'fraudulent reports'; from White's ignoble old dachshund, Fred. ('I just saw an eagle go by. It was carrying a baby.') From The New Yorker's 'The Talk of the Town' are some little-known Notes and Comment pieces covering dog shows, sled dog races, and the trials and tribulations of city canines. Some previously unpublished photographs from the E. B. White Estate show the family dogs, from the first collie, to various labs, Scotties, dachshunds, half-breeds, and mutts, all well-loved.
  • Give a Goat
    Give a Goat

    Give a Goat

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    When Mrs. Rowell's class is inspired by a rainy-day book to reach out with helping hands, wonderful things happen. Not the least of these wonderful things is a combined, enthusiastic effort by the entire class to reach a common goal. In this true story readers will discover even the smallest good-will efforts are rewarded with positive results. Humorous illustrations show the philanthropic process from inspiration through brainstorming to getting down to work, collecting funds and celebrating success. Give a Goat is a template for adults and children who want to work together to experience the satisfaction of giving to others and making a difference in the world.
  • Keep Your Ear on the Ball
    Keep Your Ear on the Ball

    Keep Your Ear on the Ball

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    In KEEP YOUR EAR ON THE BALL, by Genevieve Petrillo and illustrated by Lea Lyon, everybody wants to help Davey. "Let me open that." "Do you want to hold my hand?" Davey has one answer for all, "Thanks, but no thanks." Davey is blind--and he is perfectly capable of doing everything on his own. His well-meaning classmates stop offering help when they see how able Davey is. They respect his self-reliance--until he tries to play kickball. After several missed kicks and a trampled base keeper, no one wants Davey on his team. Working together, the children figure out a way to offer help that respects Davey's unique abilities and his desire for freedom. In this seamless tale, based on a true story, the children realize that interdependence can be just as important and rewarding as independence.
  • Kunu's Basket
    Kunu's Basket

    Kunu’s Basket

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    In KUNU'S BASKET, by Lee DeCora Francis, young Kunu wants to make a pack basket on his own. He's watched his dad and his grandfather make baskets on Indian Island, but now that he's trying to make one for himself, it's not as easy as he thought it would be. Kunu isn't a quitter, but he gets so frustrated that he has to go outside to cool off. When his grandfather asks Kunu to help him with some basket-making tasks, Kunu comes to understand that it is the tradition in his family for one generation to help the next. He also learns that it might take several tries before he gets it right. Can he be patient enough to try again and again? His grandfather shows him the way, and at last Kunu's first basket is something to celebrate.
  • Life-in-prison-cover
    Life-in-prison-cover

    Life In Prison

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    LIFE IN PRISON: Eight Hours at a Time, by Robert Reilly, is a riveting account of the author's seven year odyssey as a prison guard.
  • Life Under Ice
    Life Under Ice

    Life Under Ice

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    In LIFE UNDER ICE, Marine photographer Bill Curtsinger has returned to Antarctica a number of times to photograph the animals and plants that survive in the icy, ice-capped waters at the end of the earth. Mary Cerullo shares his story with us, telling what’s it like to start a diving trip by cutting a hole in ice eight to ten feet thick, then diving into the chilly depths with the light shining through your entry hole the only beacon to your escape route. Bill’s amazing photographs and his curiosity about the world combine to show us a strange and wonderful part of our earth.
  • Lucy's Family Tree
    Lucy's Family Tree

    Lucy’s Family Tree

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    In LUCY'S FAMILY TREE, by Karen Halvorsen Schreck, when Lucy comes home from school with a family tree assignment, she asks her parents to write her a note to excuse her from the task. Lucy's adoption from Mexico makes her feel as though her family is too 'different', but her parents gently and wisely challenge Lucy to think some more about it and to find three families that are the 'same'. As Lucy ponders her list of school and family friends who are 'normal', she comes to realize that there are many different kinds of families.
  • Moon Watchers
    Moon Watchers

    Moon Watchers

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    In MOON WATCHERS, by Reza Jalali, Shirin and her dad, looking through the tall trees in their backyard in Maine, search for a glimpse of the new moon, the sign that the month of Ramadan has begun. Ramadan is a time when Muslims around the world pray, fast, and pay special attention to doing good deeds. Shirin is nine and thinks she should be able to fast like her older brother Ali, but her parents feel she is still too young to go without food and water all day. When Shirin catches Ali sneaking food after school, she wonders: Should she tattle or is this an opportunity for a good deed?
  • Muskrat Will Be Swimming
    Muskrat Will Be Swimming

    Muskrat Will Be Swimming

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    MUSKRAT WILL BE SWIMMING, by Cheryl Savageau, is a quiet tale of a Native American girl who, with gentle guidance from her grandfather, learns to find strength, not fear, in her identity as a Native person living in an Anglo society. Beautifully illustrated and complete with a Seneca creation story, Muskrat Will Be Swimming demonstrates how the ancient stories of Native American cultures are used to help today's children find their way in the world. It is a treasure for all who have ever dealt with the fear of being different.
  • One of Us
    One of Us

    One of Us

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    In ONE OF US, by Peggy Moss and illustrated by Penny Weber, Carmen tells Roberta on her first day at a new school that she's one of them. Roberta gladly sits with the rest of the straight-up-hair girls until she hears they don't play on the monkey bars. Roberta loves the monkey bars and leaps at the chance to swing with the monkey-bar posse, until she hears they don't carry flowered lunch-boxes like she does. Roberta moves from group to group, just trying to be herself, until it seems she doesn't fit in anywhere. Then Roberta discovers some kids just like her, everyone's different and they like it that way!
  • Our Friendship Rules
    Our Friendship Rules

    Our Friendship Rules

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    Alexandra and Jenny have been best friends for a long time. But when Alexandra is momentarily dazzled by the glamour of a new girl at school, she's willing to do almost anything to get to be the cool girl's friend. Ultimately, she tells her best friend Jenny's biggest, most important secret and just like that, Alexandra is in. And Jenny is out.
  • Playing War
    Playing War

    Playing War

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    PLAYING WAR, by Kathy Beckwith, is a book about understanding what war can be like for families, and that it’s not a game, it’s also a sensitive story about the power of friendship and how children can learn from one another.
  • Project Puffin
    Project Puffin

    Project Puffin

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    In PROJECT PUFFIN, by Stephen W. Kress, readers discover why puffins, with their large, colorful beaks, their upright posture, and their big, dark eyes, are popular all over the world. But for the past hundred years, puffins along the coast of Maine have been threatened with local extinction. Biologist Stephen Kress decided to try to bring puffins back to Maine with an experiment that had never been attempted before. Stunning color photographs on every page capture each step of this wildlife success story. As you learn about The Puffin Project, you'll also learn all about puffins how they are so wonderfully adapted to their ocean environment, how they catch fish, socialize, nest in burrows, and raise their young.
  • Remember Me
    Remember Me

    Remember Me

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    In REMEMBER ME, by Donald Soctomah and Jean Flahive, readers learn how Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the man who would become the thirty-second president of the United States, joyfully spent his boyhood summers on Campobello Island. There he met Tomah Joseph, a Passamaquoddy elder and former chief who made his living as a guide, birchbark canoe builder, and basket-maker. Authors Soctomah and Flahive imagine the relationship that developed between these two as Tomah Joseph taught young Franklin how to canoe and shared some of the stories and culture of his people. A beautifully decorated birchbark canoe that he made for Franklin remains at Campobello Island, a tangible reminder of this special friendship.
  • Riparia's River
    Riparia's River

    Riparia’s River

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    In RIPARIA'S RIVER, by Michael Caduto, when Gretchen, Jason, Mark, and Daphne find their favorite swimming hole filled with green slime, they are horrified. A mysterious, almost magical naturalist named Riparia helps the children understand why the water became polluted-and together they figure out what they can do to bring clean water back to the river they all love. This lively story about non-point source pollution is filled with both information and action. Realistic, lush illustrations by Olga Pastuchiv illuminate the children's passion for their river and the ecosystem it supports.
  • Roses for Gita
    Roses for Gita

    Roses for Gita

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    In ROSES FOR GITA, by Rachna Gilmore, Gita, who recently emigrated from India and is homesick, wants to plant a garden just like her grandmother's back home. She finds an unexpected ally in her crotchety old neighbour next door, Mr. Flinch. As these two unlikely friends learn to share their love for gardening and music, Gita begins to see her lonely neighbor in a new light.
  • Saving Birds
    Saving Birds

    Saving Birds

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    In SAVING BIRDS, by Pete Salmansohn and Stephen W. Kress, we learn there are many kinds of heroes in our world. In six multicolor, multicultural stories we’ll learn about grownups and young people fighting against the odds to save wild birds--and about the birds themselves, some on the brink of extinction. Puppet shows are part of a Protection Through Pride program educating the indigenous people of the cloud forests of Chiapas, Mexico, so that they’ll join efforts to stop the habitat destruction and poaching threatening the colorful quetzals that share their forests. On Devil’s Slide Rock off the coast off California, we’ll watch young scientists brave the crashing surf and steep cliffs to restore a colony murres wiped out in an oil spill. Despite the tensions of war in Israel, work continues to keep a handsome falcon from disappearing, and in the vast and rural wetlands of southcentral China, we’ll see how the fates of black-necked cranes and impoverished villagers are tied together. Herculean efforts in New Zealand have helped save the black robin, once the world’s rarest songbird, and we’ll learn how an international team from the American zoos and organizations in Sarawak has come up with a surprising plan to save jungle hornbills from being hunted for their feathers.  
  • Say Something
    Say Something

    Say Something

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    In SAY SOMETHING, by Peggy Moss, there are some children who push and tease and bully at the local school. Sometimes they hurt other kids by just ignoring them. The girl in this story sees it happening, but she would never do these mean things herself. Then one day something happens that shows her that being a silent bystander isn't enough. Will she take some steps on her own to help another kid? Bright, fluid, realistic watercolors illustrate the story, set in a school with lots of diversity. Resources at the end of the book will help parents and children talk about teasing and bullying and find ways to stop it at school.
  • Sea Soup Zooplankton
    Sea Soup Zooplankton

    Sea Soup: Zooplankton

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    In SEA SOUP: ZOOPLANKTON, by Mary M. Cerullo, we learn that a teaspoon of sea water can hold a soupy serving of a million zooplankton! These tiny animals often look like weird life forms from outer space or larger animals such as jellyfish. In this newest volume, Mary Cerullos text answers intriguing questions about these tiny animals that have shaped our world, while Bill Curtsingers extraordinary photomicroscopy serves up tantalizing images of this sea soup. Many of the photos for these books were taken at Maine's Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science and the Darling Marine Center.
  • Sea Struck
    Sea Struck

    Sea Struck

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    SEA STRUCK, by W. H. Bunting, explores how some people seem to be born with salt water running in their veins and as soon as they are able, "go to sea." For certain young men at the turn of the last century, this was as much a rite of passage as, for others, a "season" abroad. The experience was a transitory adventure for some; for others it was a life-shaping experience. SEA STRUCK is about the final decades of American square-rigged sail, as recorded in firsthand accounts of voyages made by three genteel young men from Massachusetts.
  • sheila-cover
    sheila-cover

    Sheila Says We’re Weird (but we’re just green)

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    Sheila is either hanging over the back fence or hanging out with her neighbors. They're interesting, but they're weird. Why do they hang their laundry outside instead of using the dryer? Why are they riding their bikes to the library instead of just using the car? Why do they mow their lawn with a push mower when a gas mower is much faster? But Sheila discovers that their homemade soup sure tastes good, that she likes picking cherry tomatoes and strawberries in their garden, and it's pretty cozy to sit around the woodstove in the winter. Are Sheila's neighbors really weird, or do they have some good ideas going on?
  • Snow Squall
    Snow Squall

    Snow Squall

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    In the middle of the nineteenth century, American clipper ships astounded the maritime world with their amazingly swift passages to and from faraway seaports, bringing back exotic and valuable cargoes of tea, spices, and silk. Of all those clippers, only one remains: the Maine-built Snow Squall, whose bow section was rescued from the remote Falkland Islands by the Snow Squall Project in the 1980s. This book begins (and ends) with an unusual volunteer archaeological expedition in the aftermath of the Falkland War but quickly becomes a maritime detective story, as snow squall's story is pieced together further with information gleaned from shipping lists, newspaper accounts, disaster books, and diaries.
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