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  • Coastal Companion, A
    Coastal Companion, A

    A Coastal Companion

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    A COASTAL COMPANION, by Catherine Schmitt, is a journey through the year in the Gulf of Maine and its watershed, which includes land from eastern Massachusetts to southwestern Nova Scotia. A chronicle of changes through the seasons both above and within the sea, A COASTAL COMPANION follows the arrival and departure of migrating shorebirds in spring and fall, schools of fish as they move in and out of our region, and the natural cycles of our bays, rivers, marshes, and coastal forests. Part field guide, part almanac, the book also highlights writers, artists, and scientists who have chosen the Gulf of Maine as their subject matter
  • Day's Work, A, Part 2
    Day's Work, A, Part 2

    A Day’s Work, Part II

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    A DAY'S WORK, PART II, by W.H. Bunting, contains extraordinary collections of photographs and narrative captions that have wide appeal to anyone interested in Maine's past. Bunting has a knack for spotting the unusual in a photograph, or some minor detail that, in fact, tells a major story about the how and why. From granite quarry operations to an itinerant cobbler in a sailing scow to hootchie-cootchie dancers at the state fair to deepwater ships, his page-long captions place these images in social and economic context—but this is not dry history. His research has uncovered a wealth of fascinating, often quirky detail (did you know that mummy wrappings were imported from Egypt for Maine paper-making?), and he makes frequent forays into the Maine storytelling tradition.
  • genius-at-his-trade-cover
    genius-at-his-trade-cover

    A Genius at His Trade

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    This is the story of a supremely gifted sailor who became one of the 20th century's most innovative designers of both sail and powerboats. Today, the name C. Raymond Hunt remains synonymous with some of the most popular boats ever created. They include the classic Concordia yawls and sloops, the deep-V powerboat, the original Boston Whaler, the pioneering 1960 Miami-Nassau race-winner Moppie, and the production Bertram 25 and 31 Sportfishermen, among others.
  • genius-at-his-trade-cover
    genius-at-his-trade-cover

    A GENIUS AT HIS TRADE – paperback edition

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    This is the story of a supremely gifted sailor who became one of the 20th century’s most innovative designers of both sail and powerboats. Today, the name C. Raymond Hunt remains synonymous with some of the most popular boats ever created. They include the classic Concordia yawls and sloops, the deep-V powerboat, the original Boston Whaler, the pioneering 1960 Miami-Nassau race-winner Moppie, and the production Bertram 25 and 31 Sportfishermen, among others.
  • 9780884484653
    9780884484653

    A History of Ambition in 50 Hoaxes

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    What do the Trojan Horse, Piltdown Man, the Keely Motor Company, and the Cottingley Fairies have in common? They were all famous hoaxes--lies, carefully designed and bolstered with false evidence.
  • 50Disasters-cover
    50Disasters-cover
    $16.95$24.95

    A History of Civilization in 50 Disasters

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    The earth shakes and cracks open. Volcanoes erupt. Continents freeze, bake, and flood. Droughts parch the land. Wildfires and hundred-year storms consume anything in their paths. Invisible clouds of disease and pestilence probe for victims. Tidal waves sweep ashore from the vast sea. The natural world is a dangerous place, but one species has evolved a unique defense against the hazards: civilization.
    $16.95$24.95
    $16.95$24.95
  • 9780884483991
    9780884483991

    A History of Travel in 50 Vehicles

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    In A History of Travel in 50 Vehicles, Paula Grey explores how creative thinkers--sometimes collaborating, sometimes competing, and always building on the work of their predecessors--have envisioned new ways to move about in the world.
  • Maine Hamlet, A
    Maine Hamlet, A

    A Maine Hamlet

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    A MAINE HAMLET, by Lura Beam, describes the village of Marshfield, near Machias, Maine, at the turn of the century. Lura Beam, who was born in 1887, lived in Marshfield for twelve years with her grandparents, spent summers there another five, and visited off and on thereafter. A graduate of Barnard with a master's from Columbia, Beam had taught black children in the South for the American Missionary Association, worked for the Interchurch World Movement and the Association of American Colleges, wrote numerous articles and co-authored two books, and then, in the 1950s, turned a gentle sociologist's eye on a village she remembered quite clearly, where, for the most part, the inhabitants were closer to their Revolutionary forebears in the seasonal rhythm of their life, in the agricultural nature of their economy, and in their sense of status and family self-sufficiency, than they are to us today.
  • 9780884485483cover
    9780884485483cover

    A Man For All Oceans

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    The product of years of research, A Man for All Oceans is the most comprehensive biography of Slocum ever published, and the first written by a small-boat sailor. Author/historian Grayson uncovered previously unknown original source materials to shed new light on one of history’s greatest sailors while answering questions that have been asked ever since the publication of Sailing Alone Around The World.
  • Place on Water, A
    Place on Water, A

    A Place on Water

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    In A PLACE ON WATER, a trio of wonderful, long essays, three quite different writers - one a nature and outdoor writer, another a poet, and the third an essayist and novelist - let us sit in on their friendship and what draws them, inexorably, to the same small pond in Maine.
  • Sea Dog's Tale, A
    Sea Dog's Tale, A

    A Sea Dog’s Tale

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    Young newlyweds Peter and Dorothy Muilenburg found their way from New Hampshire to the Virgin Islands. He had been a civil rights Freedom Fighter, jailed in Mississippi while protesting racial injustice. In St.John, she founded the Pine Peace School. They both taught. On an East End beach, he built a sailboat strong enough to take them anywhere, and they put to sea with their two young sons. But their crew was not yet complete. Santos, a schipperke, came to them as a tiny puppy and sailed with them all his life.
  • Shipyard in Maine, A
    Shipyard in Maine, A

    A Shipyard in Maine

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    Toward the end of the nineteenth century, a new firm was established in Bath, Maine, at a time when established yards in the City of Ships were turning to steel construction. Percy & Small would set unrivaled records for wooden shipbuilding and ship management, launching 22 giant five- and six-masted schooners (along with 16 four-masters) in two decades. Not just builders, Percy & Small also demonstrated an unusual knack for making money as managing owners of a large fleet of schooners, and the stories of their ships are told in these pages in wonderful detail. Doug Lee's meticulously researched construction drawings add immeasurably to the technical information presented in this book. Maritime enthusiasts and modelmakers will find a wealth of information here.
  • 9780884485698cover
    9780884485698cover

    Always Share Your Iceberg: A Penguin’s Guide to Life

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    Always Share Your Iceberg: Big Words from Small Penguins is a perfect gift for Mother’s Day,Father’s Day, a graduation day?or any day!
  • As Maine Went
    As Maine Went

    As Maine Went

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    Imagine if the future well-being of your State is handed by 38% of its voters to a governor who tells the NAACP to "kiss my butt"; who jokes that the worst his lax policies on toxic chemicals in consumer products will do is cause women to grow "little beards"; who falsely claims that an active wind turbine is fake and run by "a little electric motor"; and who loudly condemns your state's public schools as the worst in the nation while a national news magazine is ranking them among the best.
  • Backyard Maine
    Backyard Maine

    Backyard Maine

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    In BACKYARD MAINE, Edgar Allen Beem examines, muses about, scoffs at, reveals, and celebrates everyday life in Maine, from high school sports to high-priced homes, aging dogs to aging cars, politics to religion, underwear to naps, berry-picking to clam festivals, and much, much more. Opinionated, insightful, humorous, and sometimes controversial, Ed Beem enjoys his role as a local observer, and these essays will resonate with anyone tuned in to day-to-day life in backyard Maine.
  • 9780884485353cover
    9780884485353cover

    Be Unstoppable – Second Edition

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    More than 25,000 copies sold in three languages! Updated and Expanded with New Content However the past has shaped you, your future is yours to shape, and if you want to shape it for success, you'll find no better coach than Alden Mills. Using the power of a parable and his own experiences as a Navy SEAL and accomplished entrepreneur, Mills teaches you his proven framework for success. BE UNSTOPPABLE is the parable of a young skipper who meets a remarkable, seasoned captain, and this chance meeting changes the young skipper's direction in life, setting him on course for living his dreams.
  • bill-moss-cover
    bill-moss-cover

    Bill Moss

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    The contributions of Bill Moss to mid-twentieth-century American culture were many. First changing the world of camping with the invention of the Pop Tent, he went on to shake the world of fabric architecture with the many forms that we now take for granted. Lavishly illustrated with historic photographs, the book chronicles Moss' creative life from his early years until his death in 1994.
  • Changing Maine
    Changing Maine

    Changing Maine

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    CHANGING MAINE, edited by Richard Barringer, is a collection of essays that explore significant changes in Maine, important policy alternatives, and the prospects for the decade ahead. On such diverse subjects as housing, education, fishing, forestry, poverty, women’s roles, the arts, politics, and land use, they challenge conventional thinking and offer a new understanding of Maine and its place in the world. Here’s a chance to hear directly from Maine’s leading policy experts.
  • continental-cover
    continental-cover

    Continental Liar

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    CONTINENTAL LIAR, by Neil Rolde, explores how, In 1884, Republican James G. Blaine came within 1,047 votes of becoming the President of the United States. This was the margin by which he lost New York State—and thus the election—to Grover Cleveland in what has been called "the dirtiest campaign in American history." Yet his career—arguably the most sensational of any American politician of the so-called Gilded Age—did not end there.
  • Down East copy
    Down East copy

    Down East, 2E

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    To modern Mainers, “Down East” refers to the Maine coast east of Penobscot Bay. Maine author and humorist John Gould wrote that Down East is “a never-never land always east of where you are.” But Lincoln Paine returns the phrase to its origins two centuries ago, when Down East meant the bold, serpentine coast teeming with timber and fish that one reached by sailing downwind and east from Boston on the prevailing southwest wind. In other words, Down East is the coast of Maine.
  • E.B. White on Dogs
    E.B. White on Dogs

    E.B. White on Dogs

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    In E. B. WHITE ON DOGS, his granddaughter and manager of his literary estate, Martha White, has compiled the best and funniest of his essays, poems, letters, and sketches depicting over a dozen of White's various canine companions. Featured here are favorite essays such as 'Two Letters, Both Open,' where White takes on the Internal Revenue Service, and also 'Bedfellows,' with its 'fraudulent reports'; from White's ignoble old dachshund, Fred. ('I just saw an eagle go by. It was carrying a baby.') From The New Yorker's 'The Talk of the Town' are some little-known Notes and Comment pieces covering dog shows, sled dog races, and the trials and tribulations of city canines. Some previously unpublished photographs from the E. B. White Estate show the family dogs, from the first collie, to various labs, Scotties, dachshunds, half-breeds, and mutts, all well-loved.
  • eating-in-maine-cover
    eating-in-maine-cover

    Eating in Maine

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    Discover places and plates old and new under the expert guidance of Jillian and Malcolm Bedell, who bring a unique Millennial Generation perspective to the Maine food scene. Month by month, the Bedells dish great Maine food, and their tastes are as wide-ranging as this book. Restaurant reviews range from Dysart's Truck Stop to Fore Street, from Fat Boy Drive-In to Duckfat. Recipes range from a riff on the Maine Italian sandwich to Spicy Lamb Meatballs with Roasted Golden Beets and Moroccan Couscous. Returning to Maine after four years in Mexico, Malcolm and Jillian found an exploding, cosmopolitan new cuisine that complements but does not eclipse traditional Maine fare. They love and celebrate it all, and so will you.
  • Ed Muskie
    Ed Muskie

    Ed Muskie

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    ED MUSKIE: MADE IN MAINE, by Jim Witherell, covers the life and career of Edmund "Ed" Muskie, from his childhood in Rumford, Maine, to his years as the governor of Maine. Born in a paper mill town in Maine's western foothills, Muskie was one of six children of a Polish immigrant and a Polish-American mother whose English was worse than her husband's. His arc through his formative years was singular and unpredictable, an American story that looks plausible only in hindsight.
  • Eminent Mainers
    Eminent Mainers

    Eminent Mainers

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    In EMINENT MAINERS, by Arthor Douglas Stover, you'll meet Hiram Abrams, born in Portland in 1878 the son of a Russian immigrant real estate broker, who attended public schools, left school at age sixteen, sold newspapers, bought a cow and started a dairy—and eventually became the founder and president of United Artists. Or Aurelia Gay Mace, born in 1835 in Strong, a Shaker from an early age, credited with the invention of the wire coat hanger. Aurelia achieved national fame in 1890 when she mistook Charles Lewis Tiffany for a tramp, gave him lemonade, brushed his clothes, insisted that he sit down for the noon meal, and sent him off with a box lunch. Tiffany responded by sending her a set of engraved silver. Meet Milton Bradley was born in Vienna (Maine) in 1836, educated at Harvard, worked as a mechanical engineer andpatent solicitor, became interested in lithography, developed a board game, "The Checkered Game of Life," and founded the Milton Bradley Company. Or Louise Bogan, who was born in Livermore Falls in 1897, moved to Greenwich Village as a young woman, took up the bohemian life and occasionally drove the get-away car for a fur thief, and ended up as the poetry critic for The New Yorker magazine. Maine boring? Never!
  • george-wardlaw-cover
    george-wardlaw-cover

    George Wardlaw: Crossing Borders

    The artworks in this volume present six decades of art making by American artist George Wardlaw (b.1927), the first comprehensive account of this remarkable body of work. Over 180 full-color plates and illustrations offer an extensive look at Wardlaw s work played out on canvases, forged in metal, constructed in objects, sculpture, and installations. Critical essays by J. Richard Gruber, Ori Z. Soltes, and Suzette McAvoy characterize Wardlaw s work, placing it in context with the significant art movements of his time, beginning in 1948, with non-objective painting and tracing his journey across geographical, physical, intellectual, philosophical, and spiritual boundaries.
  • health-foods-from-healthy-soils-cover
    health-foods-from-healthy-soils-cover

    Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils

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    Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils invites you and your students to discover where food comes from, how our bodies use food, and what happens to food waste. You’ll participate in the ecological cycle of food production > compost formation > recycling back to the soil, while helping children understand how their food choices affect not only their own health, but farmers, the environment, and your local community.
  • HerringNightsFinalCover.indd
    HerringNightsFinalCover.indd

    Herring Nights

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    In this memoir of the herring fishery along the Maine coast in the 1970s, Joe Upton draws from the place and circumstances a mythic dimension of people in an intimate dance with their natural surroundings.
  • Home-Downeast-cover
    Home-Downeast-cover

    Homes Down East

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    HOMES DOWN EAST, by Earle Shettleworth, Christopher Glass and Scott Hanson, with fascinating history, gorgeous contemporary photography, and architectural insights on every page, is a book not to be missed by anyone who loves Maine, architecture, or the still-unsurpassed homes and cottages of a century ago.
  • How To Audition On Camera
    How To Audition On Camera

    How To Audition On Camera

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    “Any actor will profit from Sharon Bialy’s advice, and, should they bring this book to any audition she and I are running, will surely get not only our attention, but our respect.” -- David Mamet To win a role in a movie or on network or cable TV, you must make a strong first impression in your brief, crucial audition--and the first person you have to impress is the casting director.
  • Idiots Revisited Jacket.indd
    Idiots Revisited Jacket.indd

    Idiots Revisited

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    For 86 years, the Red Sox labored under the Curse of the Bambino, never winning a World Series. Then in 2004, a group of self-proclaimed "Idiots" banished the curse in rare style, first defeating the Anaheim Angels 3-0 to win the division, then overcoming a 3-0 deficit to beat he infamous New York Yankees, and finally sweeping the St. Louis Cardinals 4-0. This book tells the story behind that amazing season through interviews with the men who changed Red Sox history forever.
  • PicassoCover_15
    PicassoCover_15

    If Picasso Painted a Snowman

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    “If someone asked you to paint a snowman, you would probably start with three white circles stacked one upon another. Then you would add black dots for eyes, an orange triangle for a nose, and a black dotted smile. But if Picasso painted a snowman….”  
  • Kaka-cover
    Kaka-cover

    If You Are A Kaka, You Eat Doo Doo

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    Animals use poop in a hundred ways that we would never dream of doing. In nature, nothing goes to waste—not even waste. The truth is, we humans can learn a few things about poop recycling from other animals. Here’s the real scoop on poop!
  • PalmofHand Cover_10B.cdr
    PalmofHand Cover_10B.cdr

    In the Palm of Your Hand

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    SECOND EDITION IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND, by Steve Kowit, is an illuminating and invaluable guide for beginners wary of modern poetry, as well as for more advanced students who want to sharpen their craft and write poems that expand their technical skills, excite their imaginations, and engage their deepest memories and concerns. Ideal for teachers who have been searching for a way to inspire students with a love for writing--and reading—contemporary poetry.
  • In the Shadow of the Eagle
    In the Shadow of the Eagle

    In the Shadow of the Eagle

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    In IN THE SHADOW OF EAGLE, author Donna Loring explains how Maine is the only state in the nation to have tribal representatives seated in its legislative body, a practice that began in the 1820s. Although the representatives from the Penobscot Nation and the Passamaquoddy Tribe don't have voting power on the house floor, they serve on committees and may chair committees. Donna's first session as representative of the Penobscot Nation was a difficult one--a personal struggle to have a "voice," but also because of the issues: changing offensive names, teaching Native American history in Maine schools, casinos and racinos, and the interpretation of sovereign rights for tribes. Some of the struggles and issues remain as she continues to serve, and the perspective she offers--as a Native American and as a legislator--is both valuable and fascinating.
  • Island Schoolhouse
    Island Schoolhouse

    Island Schoolhouse

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    In ISLAND SCHOOLHOUSE, author Eva Murray delves into life on six remote, windblown Maine islands, where the children are still educated in one-room schools. After two mainland one-room schools closed in 2009, these islands maintain the last taxpayer-funded public one-room elementary schools in the state. But despite very small student populations and sometimes shrinking communities, these remaining schools are not slated to close. Consolidation is impractical, a daily commute is usually impossible, island families are determined to keep their communities viable, and all agree that a school is a central part of a stable, year-round community. You might think that these tiny schools are an anachronism, offering an old-fashioned approach to education. You'd be wrong. They are among the most technologically savvy schools in the state and offer a culturally rich educational experience.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol I
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol I

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol I: Penobscot Bay

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    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.  In this volume, Penobscot Bay is explored.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol II
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol II

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol II: Mount Desert to Machias Bay

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    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps, and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.  In this volume, they cover Mount Desert to Machias Bay.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol IV
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol IV

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol IV: Pemaquid Point to the Kennebec River

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    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.
  • becton-cover
    becton-cover

    Jeffery Becton: The Farthest House

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    Jeffery Becton is a pioneer in the field of fine-art photography who creates provocative montages, often playing with the borders between dream and reality, interior and exterior, abstraction and representation. The author explores Becton's fascination with vintage New England houses and their furnishings, and how the artist draws upon his surroundings on the coast of Maine and elsewhere to create surreal scenarios than hark back to René Magritte as well as Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth.
  • Just One More Thing, Doc
    Just One More Thing, Doc

    Just One More Thing, Doc

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    In JUST ONE MORE THING, DOC, author Brad Brown returns with a second set of stories just as entertaining and fascinating as his first book. Whether he's escaping the personal vendetta of a bull named Killer ("I was a matador without a cape"),entangled with a rabid cow, chasing a stallion (well, not quite, anymore...) through downtown Bangor, performing heart surgery in an arena, or having a close encounter--while airborne--with a B-52 bomber, this vet regards it all as part of a (long) working day.
  • L.L. Bean
    L.L. Bean

    L.L. Bean: The Man and His Company

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    L.L. BEAN: THE MAN AND HIS COMPANY, by James Witherell, tells the story of L. L. Bean and how he developed his famous boot and started the mail-order company that would change the sleepy town of Freeport, Maine, into a huge outdoor mall. The story begins with the Bean family, young Leon Leonwood Bean's love of the outdoors, his first forays into sales (soap, men's clothing), and then his development of the boot and the beginnings of an outdoors outfitting company that ran on a card file system and resisted change. The story of L.L. Bean, Inc.'s phenomenal growth under grandson Leon Gorman is replete with Preppies, MBAs, infighting, and even parodies of a company that would eventually get its own Zip Code.
  • Letters from the Sea
    Letters from the Sea

    Letters from the Sea

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    In LETTERS FROM THE SEA, by Parker Bishop Albee, Jr., in June of 1881, on the very night of their wedding in Searsport, Maine, Captain Lincoln Alden Colcord and his new wife, Jane Sweetser Colcord, departed for sea to begin a two-year voyage on the bark Charlotte A. Littlefield. The voyage would take them around the world and witness the birth of their daughter Joanna amid the South Sea Islands and young Lincoln's arrival during a treacherous winter storm off Cape Horn. Fifth-generation seafarers, Joanna and Lincoln Colcord spent their youth at sea aboard their father's ships. The Colcord's richly detailed journal-letters to family members ashore, their logbooks, photographs, and later correspondence give us a splendid window into the life of a seafaring family.
  • Life Between Tides
    Life Between Tides

    Life Between Tides

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    LIFE BETWEEN THE TIDES, by Jill Fegley, John Moring, and Les Watling, is a fact-filled resource, arranged for easy identification, covering habitats, invertebrates, fishes, and marine plants. Maybe you simply enjoy walking along the beach, searching the wrack line and exploring tidepools. Or you fish or hunt in salt marshes and estuaries and are interested in all that surrounds you. Perhaps you’re involved in a closer look as an educator or volunteer along the coast. Here’s a beautifully illustrated little field guide that will help you identify and learn about the plants and animals of the intertidal zone.
  • Life-in-prison-cover
    Life-in-prison-cover

    Life In Prison

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    LIFE IN PRISON: Eight Hours at a Time, by Robert Reilly, is a riveting account of the author's seven year odyssey as a prison guard.
  • Little Pine to King Spruce
    Little Pine to King Spruce

    Little Pine to King Spruce

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    LITTLE PINE TO KING SPRUCE, by Fran Pelletier, is authentically small-town American, yet spiced by Pelletier’s French-Canadian heritage. These stories beg to be read aloud and shared.
  • LiveYankees-cover
    LiveYankees-cover

    Live Yankees

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    LIVE YANKEES, by W. H. Bunting, explores how for nearly a century members of the Sewall family built and managed a fleet of more than one hundred merchant vessels, mostly stout deepwater square-riggers. No family has been more intimately associated with the history of the city of Bath, then among the most productive shipbuilding communities of any size in the world. Despite a veneer of old-fashioned formalized civility, international shipping in the late 1800s and early 1900s was a highly competitive, low-margin, and often cut-throat business. While the Sewalls' shrewd responses to market changes make a fascinating story, the surviving correspondence from their captains offers adventure of another kind.
  • Mad for Glory Cover_19 copy(1)
    Mad for Glory Cover_19 copy(1)

    Mad For Glory

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    In October, 1812, as the 32-gun U.S. frigate Essex ventured out against the British enemy, only one man had any idea that this cruise would turn into the longest, strangest naval adventure in American history. That man was Captain David Porter, who had decided to run off with the navy's ship and its three hundred men to fight a separate Pacific war--one of privateering, pillaging, and orgies. Drawing on Porter's own writings and the accounts of eyewitnesses, the author memorably recounts the events of a dark and fatal voyage in which David Porter crosses the line from commander to cult-leader, from improbable fantasy to disastrous reality.
  • Maine in the World
    Maine in the World

    Maine in the World

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    In MAINE IN THE WORLD, by Neil Rolde, the land that became Maine produced adventurous inhabitants who went outside its boundaries to do interesting things that sometimes made them famous or even infamous. The inspiration for this book came from the tiny Pacific island of Kosrae in Micronesia, where Brewer native and Bangor Theological Seminary graduate the Reverend Galen Snow converted all of the natives to Christianity, and Portlander Harry Skillins left a record as a vicious pirate and who sired a line of descendants by native women. Others in these twenty chapters are far better known, such as poets Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Pulitzer Prize winner Edna St. Vincent Millay, opera singer Lillian Nordica, and Hollywood movie director John Ford. These stories, varied as they are, provide a continuous range of Mainers' contributions to the world at large.
  • Maine Made Guns
    Maine Made Guns

    Maine Made Guns & Their Makers

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    MAINE MADE GUNS & THEIR MAKERS, by Dwight Demeritt, explores the long and rich history of Maine's firearm history and the highly skilled Yankee gunsmiths, inventors, colorful characters, and entrepreneurs behind the scenes. It is also a story that adds to our understanding of Maine's industrial history and the significant role of Maine's gun makers during the Indian wars, the Industrial Revolution, and the Civil War. This revised, updated edition includes modern companies like Saco Defense, Inc., and the parallel history of Maine made cannons and shells. With over 400 illustrations and extensive appendices, Maine Made Guns & Their Makers is an invaluable resource for the collector or anyone interested in Maine's extraordinary history.
  • maine on glass cover
    maine on glass cover

    Maine On Glass

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    Nineteenth-century Maine - famed for its lumbering, shipbuilding, and seafaring - has attracted copious attention from historians, but early twentieth-century Maine has not. Maine on Glass redresses this imbalance with 190 postcard photos and three of Maine’s foremost historians.
  • Maine's Favorite Birds
    Maine's Favorite Birds

    Maine’s Favorite Birds

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    MAINE'S FAVORITE BIRDS, by Jeffrey and Allison Wells, is perfect for everyone from kids to grandparents, parents to teachers, Mainers and tourists alike - anyone who wants to know and better appreciate the birds they see in backyards, parks, wild areas, and nature preserves. From lush forests and rocky coastlines to lakes, mountains, and rolling fields, spectacular natural beauty and diverse habitats make Maine a wonderful place for seeing and hearing some of North America's most iconic birds. This fresh new book highlights the birds that are loved by Mainers and essential to why millions of tourists visit each year. Written by well-known birders and native Mainers, and based on their years of experience answering questions, leading bird walks, and teaching people about birds, MAINE'S FAVORITE BIRDS puts the focus on Maine's most-loved and best-known birds.
  • Maine's Visible Black History
    Maine's Visible Black History

    Maine’s Visible Black History

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    MAINE'S VISIBLE BLACK HISTORY, by H. H. Price and Gerald Talbot, explores how Black men and women have been integral parts of Maine culture and society since the beginning of the colonial era. Indeed, Mainers of African descent served in every American conflict from the King Philip's War to the present. However, the many contributions of blacks in shaping Maine and the nation have, for a number of reasons, gone largely unacknowledged. Maine's Visible Black History now uncovers and reveals a rich and long-neglected strata of state history and proves a very real connection to regional and national events.
  • Maine: The Wilder Half
    Maine: The Wilder Half

    Maine: The Wilder Half of New England

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    MAINE: THE WILDER HALF OF NEW ENGLAD, by William David Barry, is a concise, solid, and surprising overview that traces 500 years of Maine history, from first contact between Native Americans and European explorers to the achievement of a Down East identity, national political power, and worldwide cultural identification.
  • Nature and Renewal
    Nature and Renewal

    Nature and Renewal

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    NATURE AND RENEWAL: Wild River Valley & Beyond, by Dean Bennett, is the story of a magnificent wilderness in a relatively unknown valley, circumscribed by high, steep mountains--the White Mountains of Maine and New Hampshire. It is also the story of the valley's rogue river, Wild River; of a raging wildfire and the disappearance of an entire village community; of both land abuse and land stewardship; of ecological disaster and renewal; of nature's vulnerability and resiliency; and of people who experienced tragedy and good fortune.
  • New England Gardener's Year
    New England Gardener's Year

    New England Gardener’s Year

    , ,
    This comprehensive full-color what-to/when-to/how-to reference manual covers every garden and landscape planting including the most proven and popular as well as many native New England plants that deserve to be better known. Month-by-month guidance from March through October—with suggested dates for planting and tending adjusted for each zone—is augmented by advice on such topics as soil testing, composting, pruning, landscape design, and how to provide a season-long source of pollen and nectar for beneficial insects. Gardeners will find advice and photos for adapting to any microclimate or situation including shade; wet soil; coastal landscapes; container, raised-bed, and extended-season gardening; and much more.
  • New Mainers
    New Mainers

    New Mainers

    , ,
    In NEW MAINERS, author Pat Nyhan explore who these new Mainers are and why have they come to Maine. They are from war-torn countries such as Somalia, Sudan, Afghanistan, and Cambodia; from poor Latin American nations; and from economically vibrant places like Hong Kong, India, and Europe--in other words, from across the global spectrum. They came to Maine for a job or to reunite with their family or because they fell in love or to attend college here or to flee persecution in their homelands. Although the twenty-five immigrants who tell their stories had widely varying reasons for coming to Maine, many have made remarkable contributions to the state.
  • North by Northeast
    North by Northeast

    North by Northeast

    , , ,
    NORTH BY NORTHEAST, by Kathleen Mundell, explores how, for generations, Native American traditional artists in the Northeast have passed on their culture through beadwork, basketry, canoe making, wood carving, and quilting. Through the work and words of over thirty-five traditional artists living and working primarily in Maine and New York, North by Northeast explores these artists' connection to place, tradition, and cultural identity. A tribute to the resourcefulness and creativity of contemporary practicing artists from the Wabanaki, Akwesasne Mohawk, and Tuscarora tribes, the book is beautifully illustrated with the work of photographers Cedric Chatterley, Peggy McKenna, Jere DeWaters, and Peter Dembski.
  • On Wilderness
    On Wilderness

    On Wilderness

    , ,
    In ON WILDERNESS nearly forty writers, artists, and photographers in this extraordinary collection raise their voices for wilderness. They bear witness to the central role it plays in Maine, its importance to our understanding of nature, to our sense of who we are in the world, to our very souls, if you will. And some of them devote practical thinking to how we might recover and nurture wilderness in the future.
  • maine-christmas-cover
    maine-christmas-cover

    One Maine Christmas Eve

    , , , , , ,
    It's Christmas Eve in Maine, and Miss Moody and her boarders Millie and Emery--as well as her pup Smittens--are all tucked into bed, when out in the barnyard there arises such a clatter...! Turns out that Santa's reindeer have come down ill and need a chance to recuperate.  Thanks to some old-fashioned down-on-the-farm ingenuity, Santa gets back on schedule with the help of a motley but willing crew like none you've ever dreamed of.
  • One Man's Meat
    One Man's Meat

    One Man’s Meat

    ,
    In print for fifty-five years, One Man's Meat continues to delight readers with E.B. Whites witty, succinct observations on daily life at a Maine saltwater farm. Too personal for an almanac, too sophisticated for a domestic history, and too funny and self-doubting for a literary journal, One Mans Meat can best be described as a primer of a countryman’s lessons. A timeless recounting of experience that will never go out of style. First published in 1944, this classic collection of enduring commentaries is reissued here with a new introduction by the author.
  • Patriarch of Maine Shipbuilding
    Patriarch of Maine Shipbuilding

    Patriarch of Maine Shipbuilding

    , , ,
    In the years following the American Civil War, Yankee sailing ships and shipyards were threatened by foreign competition and modernizing technology. Despite decades of stiff competition, a few builders in Bath, Maine, the "City of Ships," persisted in building wooden schooners, modifying and enlarging them to meet the changing times. Gardiner G. Deering (1833-1921) was one of these diehards. The history of Deering's fleet mixes traditional New England values, sharp business sense, occupational dangers, and outright disasters, including the mystery of the schooner Carroll A. Deering, whose bizarre demise has never been fully explained. This book is the first to tell the full story of Gardiner Deering and the exploits of his many vessels. The salty tale is richly illustrated with dozens of evocative period photographs and paintings.
  • queen-bee-cover
    queen-bee-cover

    Queen Bee: Roxanne Quimby, Burt’s Bees, & Her Quest for a New National Park

    , ,
    QUEEN BEE is a fascinating biography of the woman behind the wildly successful line of natural skin care products known as Burt's Bees, veteran journalist Phyllis Austin provides insight into Roxanne Quimby s background, her determination, and her desire to protect Maine's wilderness by establishing a national park in the north woods.
  • ReadingRuralCover.indd
    ReadingRuralCover.indd

    Reading Rural Landscapes

    ,
    Everywhere we go in rural New England, the past surrounds us. In the woods and fields and along country roads, the traces are everywhere if we know what to look for and how to interpret what we see. A patch of neglected daylilies marks a long-abandoned homestead. A grown-over cellar hole with nearby stumps and remnants of stone wall and orchard shows us where a farm has been reclaimed by forest. And a piece of a stone dam and wooden sluice mark the site of a long-gone mill. Although slumping back into the land scape, these features speak to us if we can hear them—and they can guide us to ancestral homesteads and famous sites.
  • rediscovering-triscott-cover
    rediscovering-triscott-cover

    Rediscovering S.P. Rolt Triscott

    , , ,
    REDISCOVERING S. P. ROLT TRISCOTT, by Richard Malone and Earle Shettleworth, delves into the life of watercolorist Samuel Peter Rolt Triscott (1846–25) who, in 1902, moved permanently to Monhegan, becoming the first artist to live there year-round. His biography is accompanied by 50 paintings and more than 60 black and white photographs of Monhegan, printed from his glass plates. A classic nineteenth-century watercolorist in the English tradition, Triscott continued to paint, but also did photography, painted in oils, and produced hand-tinted photographs.
  • Remarkable Americans
    Remarkable Americans

    Remarkable Americans

    , ,
    REMARKABLE AMERICANS, by Kerck Kelsey, traces the lives of ten remarkable children who grew up on a simple farm in remote Livermore, Maine. Four were elected and reelected to the U.S. Congress from four different states. Two of the four would later be separately considered for Republican nomination for president and vice president of the country. Two were ambassadors, two were state governors, and two others worked to establish the great mills that would become General Mills. Growing up in rural poverty, their advantages were few, but together they left a record of achievement that will probably never be equaled again by a single generation of any American family.
  • Sea Struck
    Sea Struck

    Sea Struck

    , ,
    SEA STRUCK, by W. H. Bunting, explores how some people seem to be born with salt water running in their veins and as soon as they are able, "go to sea." For certain young men at the turn of the last century, this was as much a rite of passage as, for others, a "season" abroad. The experience was a transitory adventure for some; for others it was a life-shaping experience. SEA STRUCK is about the final decades of American square-rigged sail, as recorded in firsthand accounts of voyages made by three genteel young men from Massachusetts.
  • SeaStruckPBcover
    SeaStruckPBcover

    Sea Struck – Paperback

    , ,
    "If I’m any judge, this marvelous book should be hailed as an instant classic" —David McCullough
  • Snow Squall
    Snow Squall

    Snow Squall

    , , ,
    In the middle of the nineteenth century, American clipper ships astounded the maritime world with their amazingly swift passages to and from faraway seaports, bringing back exotic and valuable cargoes of tea, spices, and silk. Of all those clippers, only one remains: the Maine-built Snow Squall, whose bow section was rescued from the remote Falkland Islands by the Snow Squall Project in the 1980s. This book begins (and ends) with an unusual volunteer archaeological expedition in the aftermath of the Falkland War but quickly becomes a maritime detective story, as snow squall's story is pieced together further with information gleaned from shipping lists, newspaper accounts, disaster books, and diaries.
  • that-yankee-cat-cover
    that-yankee-cat-cover

    That Yankee Cat

    , ,
    THAT YANKEE CAT, by Marilis Hornridge, is the best reference guide to the first truly American breed--the Maine Coon cat. This newest revised edition includes up-to-date breeding facts, new stories, old legends, color photos, and other information essential to anyone who has fawned over a cat with ear tufts, a neck ruff, "britches," or a glorious banner-like tail. You'll also find an updated appendix listing a variety of additional resources about the Maine Coon, and a comprehensive manual of cat care helpful to any cat owner, no matter what breed they fancy.
  • A1 Diner, The
    A1 Diner, The

    The A1 Diner

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    The A1 DINER, by Sarah Rolph, starts in 1946 when Worcester Diner #790 arrived by truck and was installed at 3 Bridge Street in Gardiner, Maine. Under the name of Heald's Diner, it served employees of Gardiner's mills and factories with an emphasis on ample portions served quickly. The diner is still at 3 Bridge Street, still a marvel of efficiency and art modern design, still a local gathering place, still serving the same warm, flaky biscuits. But under the ownership of Mike Giberson and Neil Anderson since 1988, the little A1 Diner (as it is now known) draws customers (and restaurant reviews) from far and wide with its wonderfully eclectic menu (you can order Bouillabaisse or meatloaf), its emphasis on fresh, local food, and its upscale deli and specialty food store next door, A1 To Go. This is a small business success story, filled with characters from either side of the counter, packed with recipes and kitchen notes, enjoyable down to the last bite.
  • francis-hamabe-cover
    francis-hamabe-cover

    The Art of Francis Hamabe

    , ,
    One of Maine's most beloved artists, Francis Hamabe was born in 1917 in Orange, New Jersey, to a Japanese father and Swedish mother. He served in World War II and attended the Rhode Island School of Design. Moving to Maine in 1947, Hamabe established himself as a sought-after painter, printmaker, ceramicist, and pupeteer. A dedicated teacher he was the first art instructor at the Farnsworth Art Museum and later taught at the University of Maine at Machias he also served as art director for Down East and Maine Life magazines and for the state's first public television station in Orono.
  • Catboat Era, The
    Catboat Era, The

    The Catboat Era

    , ,
    THE CATBOAT ERA, by John M. Leavens, takes us to Newport, R.I. When we think of Newport at the end of the nineteenth century, we think of life lived large--big houses, big yachts, big money. But like the diversity of people to be found in any waterfront town, there was a diversity of watercraft in Newport waters. In among the yachts are found the workboats and other small craft. John Leavens took a look back at the humble catboat, and found a wealth of information about its origin, its builders, and its owners.
  • Cranberry, The
    Cranberry, The

    The Cranberry

    ,
    THE CRANBERRY, by Stephen Cole and Lindy Gifford, explores how a wild fruit became a cultivated commodity; the American cranberry contains equal amounts of holiday symbolism and antioxidants. Its evolution over the past century is a surprising story of risk, enterprise, conflict, and the tension between tradition and innovation. The cranberry is characterized by the distinctive regions--from Cape Cod to the Pacific Northwest--where it is grown. But the diminutive fruit has also changed the life and landscape of these places. THE CRANBERRY harvests stories, images, and observations to tell the unusual tale of an American subculture dominated by this tart little red fruit.
  • Hidden Coast of Maine, The
    Hidden Coast of Maine, The

    The Hidden Coast of Maine

    , , ,
    Ken Textor and photographer Joe Devenney bring readers on a guided tour of the Maine coast. The pair separately--and occasionally on assignment together--have turned over many stones in this varied 3,000-mile-long coastline, seeking out and recording its moods, seasons, and secrets. Now they are sharing their rich accumulation of images and insights.
  • Land in Between, The
    Land in Between, The

    The Land in Between

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    In THE LAND IN BETWEEN, by Beatrice Craig and Maxime Dagenais, the "land in between" is the upper Saint John Valley, a region straddling the Maine-New Brunswick border. A zone of contacts between different Native American cultures until the arrival of the Europeans, it was disputed by the British and the French in the colonial period and settled by Acadians and French Canadians in the eighteenth century. To this day, it has remained the site of a distinct French American culture, and its residents have striven to preserve their specificity and unity despite the international boundary.
  • The Life In Your Garden
    The Life In Your Garden

    The Life In Your Garden

    , ,
    Gardeners can play a significant role in helping to sustain native plant diversity and providing refuge for threatened species of insects and sanctuary for birds, amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals.
  • Old Town Canoe, The
    Old Town Canoe, The

    The Old Town Canoe Company

    , , ,
    In THE OLD TOWN CANOE COMPANY authors Susan Audette and David Baker explore the company's rich and diverse history, now spanning a century, and its story is told here in rich and colorful detail, from the earliest wood-and canvas canoes to today's sleek polymer models. Interwoven with the narratives are illustrations from the Old Town Canoe catalogs and archival photographs.
  • Rangeley, The
    Rangeley, The

    The Rangeley and Its Region

    , , , ,
    In THE RANGELEY AND ITS REGION author Stephen Cole explores the Rangeley Lakes and how they were the crucible of Maine's nineteenth-century sporting culture, and the Rangeley boat evolved out of this distinctive time and place. As essential to Rangeley as sporting camps, fishing guides, and brook trout, the namesake boat remains a true icon. THE RANGELEY AND ITS REGION tells how entwined the boat, people, lakes, town, and economy became over a century.
  • Story I Want To Tell, The
    Story I Want To Tell, The

    The Story I Want To Tell

    , , , , , ,
    A compilation of forty stories, essays, and poems. Half of them were written by young writers who work with The Telling Room in Portland, Maine, and the other half by experienced writers who were inspired by the work of their younger counterparts.
  • Voyage of Archangell, The
    Voyage of Archangell, The

    The Voyage of Archangell

    , ,
    Four hundred years ago, Captain George Waymouth sailed from England to the coast of Maine in search of a suitable site for an English colony. He and his crew spent twenty-nine days in May and June of 1605 sounding and exploring a very small area of the coast, which included an anchorage at the Georges Islands and the discovery of a "great river." Which river? This question has been an ongoing controversy, even to the present day. Our best information comes from James Rosier, who was aboard the ship Archangell as a "gentleman" employed to document the voyage. His narrative, A True Relation, gives us one of the earliest written accounts of the natural resources of northern New England and the Native people who resided here.
  • Voyage of Detroit, The
    Voyage of Detroit, The

    The Voyage of Detroit

    ,
    In 1912 Thomas Fleming Day, editor of The Rudder, decided to demonstrate the reliability of the internal combustion engine by taking a 35-foot double-ended powerboat from New York to St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip was an adventure: the vessel's freeboard was only 21/2 feet so she was usually awash and always rolling; the engine noise was deafening; and the boat caught fire and nearly blew up. After completing the rugged North Sea leg, Day writes, "...The last thing I did was to visit the engine room and kiss the motor good-bye..."
  • Wianno Senior Story, The
    Wianno Senior Story, The

    The Wianno Senior Story

    , ,
    THE WIANNO SENIOR STORY, by Stan Grayson, will fascinate anyone interested in the history of American small-boat racing and of Cape Cod. Designed and built by the Crosbys of Osterville, the Wianno Senior was first launched in 1914. Now, a hundred years later, the Wianno Senior is still flourishing, among the longest-lived one-designs in America.
  • unsettled-past-cover
    unsettled-past-cover

    Unsettled Past, Unsettled Future

    , , ,
    UNSETTLED PAST, UNSETTLED FUTURE, by Neil Rolde, delves into the headlines that have been full of controversy over casinos, racinos, land claims settlements, and sovereign rights for Native Americans in Maine—and how it’s likely that we’ll be talking about these complex issues for some time yet. A capable historian with an enjoyable narrative style, Neil Rolde puts these controversies in context by telling the larger story of Maine Indians since earliest times.
  • Voyages: A Franco-American Reader
    Voyages: A Franco-American Reader

    Voyages: A Franco-American Reader

    , , , ,
    In VOYAGES, edited by Barry Rodrigue and Nelson Madore, dozens of voices celebrate--in essays, stories, plays, poetry, songs, and art--the Franco-American and Acadian experience in Maine. They explore subjects as diverse as Quebec-Maine frontier history, immigrant drama, work, genealogy, discrimination, women, community affairs, religion, archeology, politics, literature, language, and humor. The voices, themselves, are equally diverse, including Norman Beaupré, Michael Michaud, Ross and Judy Paradis, Susann Pelletier, John Martin, Béatrice Craig, Michael Parent, Linda Pervier, Alaric Faulkner, Ray Levasseur, Yves Frenette, Paul Paré, Yvon Labbé, Rev. Clement Thibodeau, Bob Chenard, Denis Ledoux, Josée Vachon, Greg Chabot, Jean-Paul Poulain, Stewart Doty, Rhea Côté Robbins, and many others. This is a rich resource and an engaging read, one that will resonate with many.
  • Well Out to Sea
    Well Out to Sea

    Well Out to Sea

    , , ,
    What's it like to live on an island twenty-two miles out to sea? Where there are only three dozen winter residents? Where the local economy is lobstering? Period. Where your most reliable source of transportation off the island may be a small Cessna and the airstrip is dirt (or snow or mud)? Where, if the forecaster says the storm is headed safely out to sea, you know it's coming your way? Eva Murray moved to Matinicus in 1987 to teach in its one-room school. She married an island man and stayed to raise their family there. Over the years she's written a number of lively columns and articles for mainland publications. These are the stories of that unique community, of an interdependence that is all too rare these days but necessary for this island's survival.
  • While You're Here, Doc
    While You're Here, Doc

    While You’re Here, Doc

    , ,
    In WHILE YOU'RE HERE, DOC, Veterinarian Brad Brown never knew what to expect when he was called out to a farm to deal with a sick cow or an injured horse. Invariably the cash-strapped farmer would say, "While you’re here, Doc" and rattle off a list of surprise medical chores that weren’t part of the original call. But whether he was trying to geld a spooked stallion in a blizzard or found himself in the middle of an all-out fracas involving a monkey’s abscessed tooth and a shotgun, Dr. Brown took it in stride, with great affection for his four-legged patients as well as his two-legged clients. James Herriot, Baxter Black, and E. B. White rolled into one and wearing rubber boots, Brad Brown gives us a wonderful set of stories from the life of a country vet.
  • Wilderness Partners
    Wilderness Partners

    Wilderness Partners

    , ,
    WILDERNESS PARTNERS, by Phyllis Austin, tells the story of Buzz Caverly, who first joined the ranger staff at Baxter State Park in 1960, when the new park was just taking shape under the direction of Helon Taylor and the park's donor, Percival Baxter, who wished the park to be "forever wild." Caverly's legendary career in the park--one of the most unusual wilderness areas in the nation--culminated when he became park director in 1981. Over the years he saw tremendous changes in attitude about land conservation, public access, and park management. From the "Wild West" days of the 1960s to the intensely managed years of the 1990s and beyond, the clash of personalities and politics is entertaining and inspiring, and reveals the minefield of people and issues Buzz had to negotiate to save the park's wilderness character.
  • William-Irvine-cover
    William-Irvine-cover

    William Irvine

    , , ,
    William Irvine: A Painter's Journey features a stunning selection of his work, from early abstractions to an array of landscapes inspired by Maine but also by Scotland, England, and France.
  • Worthy of Sea
    Worthy of Sea

    Worthy of the Sea

    , ,
    WORTHY OF THE SEA, by Maynard Bray and Tom Jackson, explores the life of Knud Aage Nielsen and his boats and how his boats remain highly prized by their owners today for their construction quality, sensible arrangements, comfortable accomodations, and, above all, their seaworthiness. Contains many plans and photographs to study and enjoy.
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