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  • Coastal Companion, A
    Coastal Companion, A

    A Coastal Companion

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    A COASTAL COMPANION, by Catherine Schmitt, is a journey through the year in the Gulf of Maine and its watershed, which includes land from eastern Massachusetts to southwestern Nova Scotia. A chronicle of changes through the seasons both above and within the sea, A COASTAL COMPANION follows the arrival and departure of migrating shorebirds in spring and fall, schools of fish as they move in and out of our region, and the natural cycles of our bays, rivers, marshes, and coastal forests. Part field guide, part almanac, the book also highlights writers, artists, and scientists who have chosen the Gulf of Maine as their subject matter
  • Day's Work, A, Part 2
    Day's Work, A, Part 2

    A Day’s Work, Part II

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    A DAY'S WORK, PART II, by W.H. Bunting, contains extraordinary collections of photographs and narrative captions that have wide appeal to anyone interested in Maine's past. Bunting has a knack for spotting the unusual in a photograph, or some minor detail that, in fact, tells a major story about the how and why. From granite quarry operations to an itinerant cobbler in a sailing scow to hootchie-cootchie dancers at the state fair to deepwater ships, his page-long captions place these images in social and economic context—but this is not dry history. His research has uncovered a wealth of fascinating, often quirky detail (did you know that mummy wrappings were imported from Egypt for Maine paper-making?), and he makes frequent forays into the Maine storytelling tradition.
  • Maine Hamlet, A
    Maine Hamlet, A

    A Maine Hamlet

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    A MAINE HAMLET, by Lura Beam, describes the village of Marshfield, near Machias, Maine, at the turn of the century. Lura Beam, who was born in 1887, lived in Marshfield for twelve years with her grandparents, spent summers there another five, and visited off and on thereafter. A graduate of Barnard with a master's from Columbia, Beam had taught black children in the South for the American Missionary Association, worked for the Interchurch World Movement and the Association of American Colleges, wrote numerous articles and co-authored two books, and then, in the 1950s, turned a gentle sociologist's eye on a village she remembered quite clearly, where, for the most part, the inhabitants were closer to their Revolutionary forebears in the seasonal rhythm of their life, in the agricultural nature of their economy, and in their sense of status and family self-sufficiency, than they are to us today.
  • Place on Water, A
    Place on Water, A

    A Place on Water

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    In A PLACE ON WATER, a trio of wonderful, long essays, three quite different writers - one a nature and outdoor writer, another a poet, and the third an essayist and novelist - let us sit in on their friendship and what draws them, inexorably, to the same small pond in Maine.
  • Shipyard in Maine, A
    Shipyard in Maine, A

    A Shipyard in Maine

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    Toward the end of the nineteenth century, a new firm was established in Bath, Maine, at a time when established yards in the City of Ships were turning to steel construction. Percy & Small would set unrivaled records for wooden shipbuilding and ship management, launching 22 giant five- and six-masted schooners (along with 16 four-masters) in two decades. Not just builders, Percy & Small also demonstrated an unusual knack for making money as managing owners of a large fleet of schooners, and the stories of their ships are told in these pages in wonderful detail. Doug Lee's meticulously researched construction drawings add immeasurably to the technical information presented in this book. Maritime enthusiasts and modelmakers will find a wealth of information here.
  • As Maine Went
    As Maine Went

    As Maine Went

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    Imagine if the future well-being of your State is handed by 38% of its voters to a governor who tells the NAACP to "kiss my butt"; who jokes that the worst his lax policies on toxic chemicals in consumer products will do is cause women to grow "little beards"; who falsely claims that an active wind turbine is fake and run by "a little electric motor"; and who loudly condemns your state's public schools as the worst in the nation while a national news magazine is ranking them among the best.
  • Backyard Maine
    Backyard Maine

    Backyard Maine

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    In BACKYARD MAINE, Edgar Allen Beem examines, muses about, scoffs at, reveals, and celebrates everyday life in Maine, from high school sports to high-priced homes, aging dogs to aging cars, politics to religion, underwear to naps, berry-picking to clam festivals, and much, much more. Opinionated, insightful, humorous, and sometimes controversial, Ed Beem enjoys his role as a local observer, and these essays will resonate with anyone tuned in to day-to-day life in backyard Maine.
  • bill-moss-cover
    bill-moss-cover

    Bill Moss

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    The contributions of Bill Moss to mid-twentieth-century American culture were many. First changing the world of camping with the invention of the Pop Tent, he went on to shake the world of fabric architecture with the many forms that we now take for granted. Lavishly illustrated with historic photographs, the book chronicles Moss' creative life from his early years until his death in 1994.
  • Changing Maine
    Changing Maine

    Changing Maine

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    CHANGING MAINE, edited by Richard Barringer, is a collection of essays that explore significant changes in Maine, important policy alternatives, and the prospects for the decade ahead. On such diverse subjects as housing, education, fishing, forestry, poverty, women’s roles, the arts, politics, and land use, they challenge conventional thinking and offer a new understanding of Maine and its place in the world. Here’s a chance to hear directly from Maine’s leading policy experts.
  • continental-cover
    continental-cover

    Continental Liar

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    CONTINENTAL LIAR, by Neil Rolde, explores how, In 1884, Republican James G. Blaine came within 1,047 votes of becoming the President of the United States. This was the margin by which he lost New York State—and thus the election—to Grover Cleveland in what has been called "the dirtiest campaign in American history." Yet his career—arguably the most sensational of any American politician of the so-called Gilded Age—did not end there.
  • Down East copy
    Down East copy

    Down East, 2E

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    To modern Mainers, “Down East” refers to the Maine coast east of Penobscot Bay. Maine author and humorist John Gould wrote that Down East is “a never-never land always east of where you are.” But Lincoln Paine returns the phrase to its origins two centuries ago, when Down East meant the bold, serpentine coast teeming with timber and fish that one reached by sailing downwind and east from Boston on the prevailing southwest wind. In other words, Down East is the coast of Maine.
  • E.B. White on Dogs
    E.B. White on Dogs

    E.B. White on Dogs

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    In E. B. WHITE ON DOGS, his granddaughter and manager of his literary estate, Martha White, has compiled the best and funniest of his essays, poems, letters, and sketches depicting over a dozen of White's various canine companions. Featured here are favorite essays such as 'Two Letters, Both Open,' where White takes on the Internal Revenue Service, and also 'Bedfellows,' with its 'fraudulent reports'; from White's ignoble old dachshund, Fred. ('I just saw an eagle go by. It was carrying a baby.') From The New Yorker's 'The Talk of the Town' are some little-known Notes and Comment pieces covering dog shows, sled dog races, and the trials and tribulations of city canines. Some previously unpublished photographs from the E. B. White Estate show the family dogs, from the first collie, to various labs, Scotties, dachshunds, half-breeds, and mutts, all well-loved.
  • eating-in-maine-cover
    eating-in-maine-cover

    Eating in Maine

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    Discover places and plates old and new under the expert guidance of Jillian and Malcolm Bedell, who bring a unique Millennial Generation perspective to the Maine food scene. Month by month, the Bedells dish great Maine food, and their tastes are as wide-ranging as this book. Restaurant reviews range from Dysart's Truck Stop to Fore Street, from Fat Boy Drive-In to Duckfat. Recipes range from a riff on the Maine Italian sandwich to Spicy Lamb Meatballs with Roasted Golden Beets and Moroccan Couscous. Returning to Maine after four years in Mexico, Malcolm and Jillian found an exploding, cosmopolitan new cuisine that complements but does not eclipse traditional Maine fare. They love and celebrate it all, and so will you.
  • Ed Muskie
    Ed Muskie

    Ed Muskie

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    ED MUSKIE: MADE IN MAINE, by Jim Witherell, covers the life and career of Edmund "Ed" Muskie, from his childhood in Rumford, Maine, to his years as the governor of Maine. Born in a paper mill town in Maine's western foothills, Muskie was one of six children of a Polish immigrant and a Polish-American mother whose English was worse than her husband's. His arc through his formative years was singular and unpredictable, an American story that looks plausible only in hindsight.
  • Eminent Mainers
    Eminent Mainers

    Eminent Mainers

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    In EMINENT MAINERS, by Arthor Douglas Stover, you'll meet Hiram Abrams, born in Portland in 1878 the son of a Russian immigrant real estate broker, who attended public schools, left school at age sixteen, sold newspapers, bought a cow and started a dairy—and eventually became the founder and president of United Artists. Or Aurelia Gay Mace, born in 1835 in Strong, a Shaker from an early age, credited with the invention of the wire coat hanger. Aurelia achieved national fame in 1890 when she mistook Charles Lewis Tiffany for a tramp, gave him lemonade, brushed his clothes, insisted that he sit down for the noon meal, and sent him off with a box lunch. Tiffany responded by sending her a set of engraved silver. Meet Milton Bradley was born in Vienna (Maine) in 1836, educated at Harvard, worked as a mechanical engineer andpatent solicitor, became interested in lithography, developed a board game, "The Checkered Game of Life," and founded the Milton Bradley Company. Or Louise Bogan, who was born in Livermore Falls in 1897, moved to Greenwich Village as a young woman, took up the bohemian life and occasionally drove the get-away car for a fur thief, and ended up as the poetry critic for The New Yorker magazine. Maine boring? Never!
  • HerringNightsFinalCover.indd
    HerringNightsFinalCover.indd

    Herring Nights

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    In this memoir of the herring fishery along the Maine coast in the 1970s, Joe Upton draws from the place and circumstances a mythic dimension of people in an intimate dance with their natural surroundings.
  • Home-Downeast-cover
    Home-Downeast-cover

    Homes Down East

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    HOMES DOWN EAST, by Earle Shettleworth, Christopher Glass and Scott Hanson, with fascinating history, gorgeous contemporary photography, and architectural insights on every page, is a book not to be missed by anyone who loves Maine, architecture, or the still-unsurpassed homes and cottages of a century ago.
  • Idiots Revisited Jacket.indd
    Idiots Revisited Jacket.indd

    Idiots Revisited

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    For 86 years, the Red Sox labored under the Curse of the Bambino, never winning a World Series. Then in 2004, a group of self-proclaimed "Idiots" banished the curse in rare style, first defeating the Anaheim Angels 3-0 to win the division, then overcoming a 3-0 deficit to beat he infamous New York Yankees, and finally sweeping the St. Louis Cardinals 4-0. This book tells the story behind that amazing season through interviews with the men who changed Red Sox history forever.
  • In the Shadow of the Eagle
    In the Shadow of the Eagle

    In the Shadow of the Eagle

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    In IN THE SHADOW OF EAGLE, author Donna Loring explains how Maine is the only state in the nation to have tribal representatives seated in its legislative body, a practice that began in the 1820s. Although the representatives from the Penobscot Nation and the Passamaquoddy Tribe don't have voting power on the house floor, they serve on committees and may chair committees. Donna's first session as representative of the Penobscot Nation was a difficult one--a personal struggle to have a "voice," but also because of the issues: changing offensive names, teaching Native American history in Maine schools, casinos and racinos, and the interpretation of sovereign rights for tribes. Some of the struggles and issues remain as she continues to serve, and the perspective she offers--as a Native American and as a legislator--is both valuable and fascinating.
  • Island Schoolhouse
    Island Schoolhouse

    Island Schoolhouse

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    In ISLAND SCHOOLHOUSE, author Eva Murray delves into life on six remote, windblown Maine islands, where the children are still educated in one-room schools. After two mainland one-room schools closed in 2009, these islands maintain the last taxpayer-funded public one-room elementary schools in the state. But despite very small student populations and sometimes shrinking communities, these remaining schools are not slated to close. Consolidation is impractical, a daily commute is usually impossible, island families are determined to keep their communities viable, and all agree that a school is a central part of a stable, year-round community. You might think that these tiny schools are an anachronism, offering an old-fashioned approach to education. You'd be wrong. They are among the most technologically savvy schools in the state and offer a culturally rich educational experience.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol I
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol I

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol I: Penobscot Bay

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    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.  In this volume, Penobscot Bay is explored.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol II
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol II

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol II: Mount Desert to Machias Bay

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    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps, and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.  In this volume, they cover Mount Desert to Machias Bay.
  • Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol IV
    Islands of the Mid Coast, Vol IV

    Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast, Vol IV: Pemaquid Point to the Kennebec River

    , ,
    The McLanes have delved into a wealth of primary sources, using old tax assessments, court records, and early maps, to spin their tales of the early settlers of Maine's islands and their descendants. Here is history as it too seldom is in textbooks: colorful, human, downright irresistible. Each volume is replete with rare vintage photos and dozens of maps and will delight all who love islands, or simply a good read.
  • becton-cover
    becton-cover

    Jeffery Becton: The Farthest House

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    Jeffery Becton is a pioneer in the field of fine-art photography who creates provocative montages, often playing with the borders between dream and reality, interior and exterior, abstraction and representation. The author explores Becton's fascination with vintage New England houses and their furnishings, and how the artist draws upon his surroundings on the coast of Maine and elsewhere to create surreal scenarios than hark back to René Magritte as well as Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth.
  • Just One More Thing, Doc
    Just One More Thing, Doc

    Just One More Thing, Doc

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    In JUST ONE MORE THING, DOC, author Brad Brown returns with a second set of stories just as entertaining and fascinating as his first book. Whether he's escaping the personal vendetta of a bull named Killer ("I was a matador without a cape"),entangled with a rabid cow, chasing a stallion (well, not quite, anymore...) through downtown Bangor, performing heart surgery in an arena, or having a close encounter--while airborne--with a B-52 bomber, this vet regards it all as part of a (long) working day.
  • L.L. Bean
    L.L. Bean

    L.L. Bean: The Man and His Company

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    L.L. BEAN: THE MAN AND HIS COMPANY, by James Witherell, tells the story of L. L. Bean and how he developed his famous boot and started the mail-order company that would change the sleepy town of Freeport, Maine, into a huge outdoor mall. The story begins with the Bean family, young Leon Leonwood Bean's love of the outdoors, his first forays into sales (soap, men's clothing), and then his development of the boot and the beginnings of an outdoors outfitting company that ran on a card file system and resisted change. The story of L.L. Bean, Inc.'s phenomenal growth under grandson Leon Gorman is replete with Preppies, MBAs, infighting, and even parodies of a company that would eventually get its own Zip Code.
  • Letters from the Sea
    Letters from the Sea

    Letters from the Sea

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    In LETTERS FROM THE SEA, by Parker Bishop Albee, Jr., in June of 1881, on the very night of their wedding in Searsport, Maine, Captain Lincoln Alden Colcord and his new wife, Jane Sweetser Colcord, departed for sea to begin a two-year voyage on the bark Charlotte A. Littlefield. The voyage would take them around the world and witness the birth of their daughter Joanna amid the South Sea Islands and young Lincoln's arrival during a treacherous winter storm off Cape Horn. Fifth-generation seafarers, Joanna and Lincoln Colcord spent their youth at sea aboard their father's ships. The Colcord's richly detailed journal-letters to family members ashore, their logbooks, photographs, and later correspondence give us a splendid window into the life of a seafaring family.
  • Life Between Tides
    Life Between Tides

    Life Between Tides

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    LIFE BETWEEN THE TIDES, by Jill Fegley, John Moring, and Les Watling, is a fact-filled resource, arranged for easy identification, covering habitats, invertebrates, fishes, and marine plants. Maybe you simply enjoy walking along the beach, searching the wrack line and exploring tidepools. Or you fish or hunt in salt marshes and estuaries and are interested in all that surrounds you. Perhaps you’re involved in a closer look as an educator or volunteer along the coast. Here’s a beautifully illustrated little field guide that will help you identify and learn about the plants and animals of the intertidal zone.
  • Life-in-prison-cover
    Life-in-prison-cover

    Life In Prison

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    LIFE IN PRISON: Eight Hours at a Time, by Robert Reilly, is a riveting account of the author's seven year odyssey as a prison guard.
  • Little Pine to King Spruce
    Little Pine to King Spruce

    Little Pine to King Spruce

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    LITTLE PINE TO KING SPRUCE, by Fran Pelletier, is authentically small-town American, yet spiced by Pelletier’s French-Canadian heritage. These stories beg to be read aloud and shared.
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